Launch Slideshow

The Savior of New Orleans?

The Savior of New Orleans?

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3BF%2Etmp_tcm20-167543.jpg

    true

    600

    Bring New Orleans Back Commission, Urban Planning Final Report

    The Flooding: September 2005 A map of the post-hurricane flooding shows that the depth ranged considerably from neighborhood to neighborhood: less than 4 feet in the French Quarter, for instance, but up to 10 or more feet closer to Lake Pontchartrain.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C0%2Etmp_tcm20-167550.jpg

    true

    600

    BRING NEW ORLEANS BACK COMMISSION, URBAN PLANNING FINAL REPORT

    An early recovery plan called Bring New Orleans Back proposed that some of the worst-hit areas be left to nature as "future parkland" (designated by dashed circles). The plan was met with anger and accusations of racism from many city residents.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C1%2Etmp_tcm20-167557.jpg

    true

    600

    Jackson Hill

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C2%2Etmp_tcm20-167564.jpg

    true

    600

    Jackson Hill

    Wearing a New Orleans Saints jersey, Ed Blakely leads a public bike ride through the Riverbend and Carrollton neighborhoods, June 3, 2007.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C3%2Etmp_tcm20-167571.jpg

    true

    600

    Jackson Hill

    Wearing a New Orleans Saints jersey, Ed Blakely leads a public bike ride through the Riverbend and Carrollton neighborhoods, June 3, 2007.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C4%2Etmp_tcm20-167578.jpg

    true

    600

    City of New Orleans

    City of New Orleans Recovery Plan: March 2007 IIn March, Blakely announced a new city recovery plan focused on 17 recovery areas. The plan (above) classifies the areas into three categories: rebuild (areas that were devastated by flooding); redevelop (neighborhoods that have modest resources in place); and renew (districts that are already more or less viable, but could use further help). Only two neighborhoods are rebuilds: the Lower Ninth Ward and New Orleans East Plaza.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C5%2Etmp_tcm20-167585.jpg

    true

    600

    CARROLLTON Carrollton qualifies as redevelop.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpB3C6%2Etmp_tcm20-167592.jpg

    true

    600

    BROADMOOR Broadmoor qualifies as renew.

AN ED BLAKELY TIMELINE
  • 1938
    Born in San Bernardino, Calif.
  • 1960
    B.A., History/Political Science & Economics, University of California, Riverside
  • 1964
    M.A., History and Development Studies, University of California, Berkeley
  • 1967
    Master of Management, Pasadena Nazarene College
  • 1970
    Ph.D., Management and Education, University of California, Los Angeles
  • 1972-83
    Helps develop rural community and health policies in West Africa
  • 1977-94
    Holds various positions at the University of California, Berkeley, including chair of the Department of City and Regional Planning
  • 1988
    Leads response to earthquake in Oakland, Calif.
  • 1991
    Leads response to Oakland firestorm, which destroyed nearly 3,000 homes
  • 1994-98
    Dean of the School of Urban Planning and Development, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • 1998
    Runs for mayor of Oakland against ex-California Gov. Jerry Brown, finishing second
  • 1998-2003
    Helps develop regional economic policies in China
  • 1999-2004
    Dean of the Robert J. Milano Graduate School of Management and Urban Policy, New School University, New York
  • 2004-07
    Chair of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Sydney, Australia
  • 2007 present
    Executive Director for Recovery Management, City of New Orleans