Courtesy Kengo Kuma Lab, The University of Tokyo

Regarded as the earthworms of the sea, sea cucumbers have the ability to transform their endoskeletons from liquid to solid instantaneously, according to Popular Science. These remarkable creatures were the inspiration for Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, Hon. FAIA's woven, tubular design for the 2018 Design Canberra Festival's inaugural installation.

Located on Aspen Island in the Australian capital, Kuma's U-shaped structure is supported by a steel rod frame structure and mesh made with bio-acrylic rods, according to a press release. Woven zip ties hold the structure together, making it rigid enough for visitors to sit on while also acknowledging the sea cucumber's organic softness.

Courtesy Kengo Kuma Lab, The University of Tokyo

A prototype for the installation was revealed in Tokyo in early July. It is on display at LIXIL Gallery, Kyobashi Building in Tokyo now until Sept. 25. When it opens on Aspen Island in November, the natural wildlife will contrast to the synthetic materials used to form the structure. The installation is collaboration between Kuma and students from the University of Canberra and the University of Tokyo.

Now in it's fifth year, the Design Canberra Festival looks to celebrate the city's 25th anniversary of its sister-city relationship agreement with Nara, Japan. "The project promotes experimental and authentic design, fostering international collaboration and design education,” says Rachael Coghlan, CEO of Craft ACT and artistic director of Design Canberra 2018, in the release.

Courtesy Kengo Kuma Lab, The University of Tokyo