This story was originally published in Multifamily Executive.

Photos courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

Denmark-based architecture firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) recently completed a 66-unit affordable housing development in Copenhagen made from stacked prefabricated modules.

The building stands as one continuous, 73,195-square-foot winding wall of prefabricated modules stacked on top of each other to complete the five-story structure. The design allows each apartment to have a small terrace—on the sunny, southern side, the balconies are set in, adding depth to the façade; on the northern side, the façade is flat.

Photos courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

The "retracted" balconies create a checkered effect on the building, whose curved center provides space for a public plaza toward the street on the south side and an intimate green courtyard toward the north. Residents of both the community and neighboring buildings may use the two areas for recreational activities. Openings at the street level allow residents and the general public to pass into the courtyard.

Each apartment unit ranges from 645 square feet to 1,200 square feet and features floor-to-ceiling windows, for plentiful natural light, and ceilings measuring almost 12 feet.

Photos courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

The Dortheavej Residence, located in the neighborhood of Dortheavej in northwestern Copenhagen, was commissioned by Danish nonprofit affordable housing association Lejerbo as part of the "Homes for All" mission. The project combines high design with affordability on a strict budget, says BIG.

The prefab building technique, and the use of simple wood and concrete building materials both inside and out, allowed the firm to keep construction costs low. The final cost of the building totaled $9.8 million.

This story was originally published in Multifamily Executive.